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Film Reviews Dropping In: The True Story of Don Wimmer Film News And Views - Film Reviews - Dropping In: The True Story of Don Wimmer Film Reviews,,Dropping In: The True Story of Don Wimmer,recommendation,shopping,advice,simple,movies,films,film news and views,news and views,film industy,movie reviews,film news,film,news,views,television,made for tv movies,interactive entertainment,hollywood,hollywood news,celebrity news,insiders perspective,film reviewer,watch film,film trailer,new releases,new release,new release movie,new release film,movie reviewer,opinion,viewpoint,forum,discussion
Dropping In: The True Story of Don Wimmer

by Erik Sean McGiven on Apr 04, 2009

 

"Dropping In" is a documentary-style narrative about a 42-year old accountant who gives up his job and recommits himself to becoming a professional skateboarder.  Never mind that Don Wimmer, vividly portrayed by David Klane, is more than twice the age of average pro skater, can't skate very well, and is constantly drinking and smoking.  It's absurd to think Don can fulfill his childhood dream, yet his amiable vulnerability pulls us in and we cheer for him all the way.

Most of us have unfulfilled dreams and this film reflects that universal desire to pursue those 'what ifs' in our lives.  What makes Don Wimmer so unique is that he actually takes the plunge and sets out to accomplish this almost impossible feat.   His quest is a metaphor for our dreams and the sacrifices we must make to reach them.  And what makes this story so appealing is that his journey is frothed with so many missteps, blunders, and errors in judgment a normal person would make a hasty retreat, but not Don Wimmer.  He stumbles on relentlessly and when he falters, his friends prop him up and push him onward.

The film is told from the viewpoint of JP Parcel (Christopher Manus) a first-time filmmaker who prods Don into revealing more and more about himself.  JP skillfully steers his subject around the bumps and detours to keep him from self-destructing. There's a caring brotherly connection between the two, one that allows Don to talk himself through the best and worst of situations.  Don also persuades others into aiding his cause.  His landlady, realistically played by Laura Lang, is dubious about his chances and she adds another dimension to this tittering character.  Yet it is her son, Jason, brilliantly portrayed by Tim Banning, who adds many comic touches as Don's wacky sidekick. Developmentally 'special' he's like a rambunctious child of 18 and looks on Don as a father. 

The film takes an insightful look at skate boarding.  In most sports participants display their clippings and highlight reels.  But in this sport, x-rays are the badges of honor as they document the grave injuries sustained.  Don proudly displays several.  It's a dangerous sport and the film, thankfully, tresses the point along with appropriate safety measures.    

There are plenty of laughs in this faux-documentary, some cerebral others pure visual slapstick comedy.  The climatic scene at his first tournament is well worth the journey for it segues beautifully into a surprisingly happy and altogether appropriate ending.  This is a film for skateboarders, former skateboarders, and those thinking about dropping out of a bad situation and dropping into something much more satisfying.  "Dropping In" is an empowering feel-good film for all ages. 

Production values give a fly-on-the-wall catch-as-catch-can perspective to this film.  You get the feeling this is all for real and the participants are actual people in the life of Don Wimmer.  This is a tribute to a talented cast as well as a diligent crew for catching the improvised and unplanned moments.  The title "Dropping In" refers to the precarious moment when the skateboarder posed at the lip and drops into the bowl.  The film was shot over a three-year period, evident by the length of beards in some scenes.  It has garnered much attention on the web; one of which is the Guinness Book of World Records assault on the standup downhill speed record.  

CREDITS: Stars David Klane, Christopher Manus, Tim Banning, and Laura Lang.  Directed by Matthew Manus; Written by Mathew Manus and David Klane; Music by Carlos Jose Alvarez; Edited by Dan Steller; Produced by Mathew Manus, Cynthia Klane, Dan Steller, and David Klane.  A Dropping In LLC Production.  Running Time 83 minutes.

 

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  May 26, 2019

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